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As we age, the idea of sitting in a doctor’s office receiving bad news is your worst fear. It seems that as we age, more and more goes wrong with our health, but, there is so much we still want to do while we are able-bodied and clear of mind. Each visit to the doctor comes with a dread of a life-changing diagnosis like Alzheimer’s, MS, or congestive heart failure.

 

Thankfully, while one of these diagnoses isn’t what you want to hear, it doesn’t have to be a bombshell. Plenty of people live long healthy lives with a life-changing diagnosis and here are a few tips on how.

Second Opinion

 

Putting all of your eggs in one basket is easy. After, the person in front of you is a medical expert with decades of experience. If anyone understands the human body, it’s this person. Of course, doctors are still human beings and are capable of making errors. With that in mind, it’s essential to remain positive until you get a second opinion and confirm the initial diagnosis. Until that point, nothing is set in stone and you may not have to worry about anything. Book a consultation with another physician and ask them for their opinion.

Treatment Options

 

Even if it is confirmed, there are plenty of options on the table. Depending on the ailment, you may be able to treat it anything from chemotherapy to radiotherapy. And, there is surgery too. Sometimes, a bad diagnosis means that your lifestyle has to change but there is no immediate danger. Parkinson’s disease, for example, makes people feel uneasy yet it’s very manageable with modern medicine and a healthy diet. Thanks to advancements in technology, there is a good chance you will have a way to fight back and turn bad news into the good kind.

Support Groups

 

How do you know that there is hope? The answer is due to support groups. When people are diagnosed, there is a feeling of helplessness. It’s as if you are all alone in a world with billions of men, women, and children. Of course, this isn’t true and a social network such as Shift MS is living proof. Connecting MS suffers, the community can leave questions, get them answered or vent about their condition. Also, there are steps on what is next and how to proceed from people who have been there and done it. With support from others, anything is possible.

 

PMA

 

PMA stands for a positive mental attitude. Although good vibes may not be what people think when pondering modern medicine, they are very powerful. Studies prove that a healthy attitude can help patients deal with any diagnosis. Staying positive makes it more likely that you will bounce back and recover as it focuses your mind on the fight. It’s by no means straightforward, and Psychology Today can help, yet it is something that is always within your control as long as you understand the benefits.

 

Hopefully, the advice above will help you to see the positives even when you receive bad news.

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Radical lesbian baby boomer and ghost writer trying to change the world one book at a time.

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3 Comments

  1. These 4 tips is important for us to know if we are undergoing a life changing illness.

  2. Awesome tips. I know how this can effect you. When my husband was diagnosed with ALS in 2016 it was as if the bottom fell out of everything. I couldn’t eat, couldn’t sleep, burst into tears in the grocery store. What I can say is don’t be afraid to ask your doctor for something to cope. The meds my doctor prescribed for me were lifesavers.

    1. Thank you for sharing. People often forget that a life-changing diagnosis doesn’t just affect the patient but the entire family. Often the family member who is the primary caretaker finds themselves overwhelmed with emotions and has no way to vent them, as to keeping a “brave face” for the patient. Caregivers need to make sure they take care of themselves and seek help when they need it.

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